Chapter 10: Technology Use in Family Health and Money Management

10.4 Blog Prompts

In the chapter we’ve looked at financial education games for children, allowance and chore management apps for families, and financial management apps (e.g., Venmo). We’ve also considered the types of health-related questions parents might ask online. Return to those activities, choose one (financial access or health information), and go online to identify at least three different sources. Compare and contrast through the eyes of a parent, and discuss the merits or challenges of selecting a site, app, game, or device.

Check out “10 Interactive financial websites that teach kids money management skills.” Offer your thoughts about one or more of the games or apps as a way for children to learn about money. If you were a parent, would you select one or more of these for your child? Would it depend on the child’s age? What is your assessment of the game or app?

Finding information on health and using technology to manage finances are both commonplace for families. Yet it can be hard to do. Information searches yield an overwhelming amount of information, and navigating apps for tracking finances can feel scary when families hear about security breaches. All of this is even harder when adults don’t speak English, have a disability, or live in highly stressful conditions (e.g., homelessness, abuse). As family professionals, how do we advocate for the health and financial access through technology for everyone?

We’ve discussed spending on technology, and you’ve considered how much of your own budget is spent on digital technology and the internet. Consider this for a family. How might spending on technology cut into a family budget? Look around for guidance on tech spending — particularly important over the holiday season, as technology is a major expenditure. What recommendations would you make to help families keep track of their technology spending online?

 

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