Contributors

Editors and Editorial Assistants

  • My greatest thanks for making this book possible goes out to Shane Nackerud and Tina Tram of the University of Minnesota Libraries, who transitioned this manuscript from the website where it was originally posted into this open textbook. They formatted and edited each of these chapters, sought permissions, and found most of the images that are displayed here. Their labor is the reason why this book exists and I am greatly indebted to them for their semesters-long effort in creating this resource.
  • Makayla Hillukka was a Spring 2022 Dean’s First-Year Research & Creative Scholars (DFRACS) fellow and undergraduate research assistant for the UnTextbook at the University of Minnesota Twin-Cities. Makayla’s recorded readings appear in Chapter 12: The Secrecy Situation and Chapter 14: The Digital Situation.
  • Milena Yishak was a Spring 2022 Dean’s First-Year Research & Creative Scholars (DFRACS) fellow and undergraduate research assistant for the UnTextbook at the University of Minnesota Twin-Cities. Milena’s recorded readings appear in Chapter 8: Rhetoric and Narrative and Chapter 14: The Digital Situation.

Content Contributors

  • Dr. Michael Lechuga researches and teaches Latina/o/x Studies Communication Studies, Rhetoric, Migration and Settler Colonialism Studies, and Affect Studies. His research explores the ways migrants and migrant communities are subjected in the US by austere migration control structures and white nationalist ideologies. His current research focuses on the role that technology plays in border security assemblages and the ways alienhood is mapped onto migrant bodies through contemporary mechanisms of white-settler governance. His recorded lecture, “Incomunicable,” originally delivered at the Hugh Downs School of Communication at Arizona State University, appears in Chapter 11: The Settler Situation.
  • Dr. Emily Winderman specializes in the rhetorical study of a wide range of reproductive healthcare, including birth control, family planning, abortion care, and birthing practices. She generally approaches these topical areas through the theoretical affordances of affect theory and public emotion, rhetorical history, and public address. Specifically, her work asks “what emotions do” in order to constitute, shape, and manage different publics’ relationships to health. Her recorded lecture on “The Narrative Paradigm” appears in Chapter 8: Rhetoric and Narrative.

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Reading Rhetorical Theory by Atilla Hallsby is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

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